A writer is

a person whose most absorbed and passionate hours are spent arranging words on pieces of paper. I write entirely to find out what’s on my mind, what I’m thinking, what I’m looking at, what I’m seeing and what it means, what I want and what I’m afraid of

Joan Didion

Notebook

Keep a notebook. Travel with it, eat with it, sleep with it. Slap into it every stray thought that flutters up in your brain. Cheap paper is less perishable than gray matter, and lead pencil markings endure longer than memory.

Jack London

Diary

In your desk or bag Or beside your bed Somewhere for the thoughts Stuck inside your head Memories and dreams And important dates To make notes or be A fancy paperweight Open and willing Waiting just for you To write down in me That it’s now time to

Say to yourself “hara hachi bu” before your next meal, it’s a great reminder

“Hara hachi bun me (腹八分目/はらはちぶんめ), (or hara hachi bu), is a Confucian teaching that instructs people to eat until they are 80 percent full. Roughly, in English the Japanese phrase translates to, “Eat until you are eight parts (out of ten) full” or “belly 80 percent full.” As of the early 21st century, Okinawans in Japan, through practicing harahachi bu, are the only human population to have a self-imposed habit of calorie restriction. They consume about 1,800 to 1,900 kilo-calories per day. Their elders’ typical body mass index (BMI) is about 18 to 22, compared to a typical BMI of 26 or 27 for adults over 60 in the United States. Okinawa has the world’s highest proportion of centenarians, at approximately 50 per 100,000 people.”